Posts Tagged ‘installation’

Joris Kuipers

Written by Valentina on . Posted in art, installation

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Joris Kuipers‘ installations are inspired by bodily cross-sections from MRI scans and CT scans:

“Joris Kuipers’ works find their origin in historic, scientific and/or anatomic sources ranging from the woodcuts by Andreas Vesalius to CT-scans, MRI-scans, autopsy images and the plastinations by Gunther von Hagens. As in medical practice, Joris dissects the body layer by layer. After this fragmentation, the body is rearranged in a non-rational manner, in order to reveal emotional significance.”

[via]

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Serpent d’Océan – Huang Yong Ping

Written by Andrea on . Posted in art, installation

Serpent d'Océan - Huang Yong Ping

“By having a major figure from Chinese mythology appear on European shores, Huang Yong Ping examines, the notions of identity and cultural hybridity, as is often the case in his work. The environmental question is also very present in his art where he regularly exposes the paradox of the man sawing the branch he is sitting on, torn between creative abilities and destructive impulses. This is one of the many possible interpretations of this work: placed on the beach, the skeleton appears with the tide and, little by little, will be home to marine fauna and flora.”

Serpent d’Océan by Huang Yong Ping was created as a permanent work for the Estuaire contemporary art exhibition in 2012.

Serpent d'Océan - Huang Yong Ping

Serpent d'Océan - Huang Yong Ping

Serpent d'Océan - Huang Yong Ping

Serpent d'Océan - Huang Yong Ping

Serpent d'Océan - Huang Yong Ping

Serpent d'Océan - Huang Yong Ping

Sources: Nantes Tourisme, Laughing Squid, Flickr.
(All photographs shown in this post might be copyrighted by their respective owners)

Let’s Eat Outdoors Today

Written by Valentina on . Posted in art, installation

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Damien Hirst, Let’s Eat Outdoors Today, 1990 – 1991:

“The vitrine is split equally. One half contains a steel barbecue covered in raw meat; underneath the barbecue, trays of maggots are inserted where the coals should be. The hatched flies pass through a four inch circular hole, so that the vitrine is reminiscent of the face of a die, in the glass between the two halves. In the other half the abandoned remnants of a typical family’s outdoor meal is presented, a cow’s head lies beneath the table. An Insect-O-Cutor is positioned above the table, it’s tray removed so that the dead flies fall into the food. Hirst describes the work as an exploration into human attempts at “trying to isolate the horror from our lives and remove it.”

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Mc Donald’s Hell

Written by Valentina on . Posted in art, installation

ChapmanInstallation

Jack and Dinos Chapman’s latest installation is, as always, shocking and stunning:

It’s as pessimistic as we can make it but it’s pessimistic in a joyful sense. Fatalistic in a joyful sense. There’s nothing foreboding about this. It doesn’t serve any kind of moral end…We take McDonald’s as being a marker of the transformation from industrialisation to the end of the world. McDonald’s once represented the idealism of fast food and the space rest era. Now it’s consistent with the dilation of the ozone and a litigious clown who’s lost his sense of humour.’

[via beautiful decay]

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